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Air Force Aid Society (AFAS)

The AIR FORCE AID SOCIETY (AFAS) is the official charity of the U.S. Air Force. It promotes the Air Force mission by helping "to relieve distress of Air Force members and their families and assisting them to finance their education". It is rooted in the original Army Air Corps and the World War II Army Air Forces, whose members wanted to "take care of their own." Through the years, AFAS has become increasingly effective in helping individuals with personal emergencies-- as well as extremely useful when used by commanders to help solve personnel problems in their units.

Posted in US Air Force



DoD Can Help Troops Get Civilian Credentials, Board Says

By Andrew Tilghman

An Air Force B-2 Spirit pilot can fly across oceans carrying nuclear payloads, but he will need to apply for a civilian pilot's license before he can get a job shuttling businessmen from New York to Washington, D.C.

Posted in Veterans News



Remembering the Tuskegee Airmen and Red Tails on Memorial Day

Despite a history of more than 150 years of courageous combat service, World War II left African-Americans serving in segregated units and primarily resulted in assignments to support functions instead of being allowed to fight. However, one unit specifically fought to prove the equal capability of African-Americans in combat -- the Tuskegee Airmen.

Trained at Tuskegee Army Air Field, Ala., 992 men graduated from pilot training, after which they were assigned to the all African-American 332nd Fighter Group in North Africa and Italy.

Posted in Veterans News



Apps Designed to Help Wounded Warriors

Handheld technology helping to heal the invisible scars of war.

1888 Views | 239 Likes


Posted in Veterans Videos



Returning Veterans Swell Ranks Of US Entrepreneurs

By Michael Melia, Associated Press

HARTFORD, Conn.--As a truck driver for the U.S. military in wartime Iraq, Ed Young racked up 7,000 miles, facing a constant threat of attack that left him struggling with depression and suicidal thoughts.

Four years later, he is driving long hauls again, but now in the U.S. as one of a growing number of veterans turning entrepreneur. The Navy veteran who had seen his post-war life spiraling out of control says his Connecticut-based car transportation business has helped to put him on the road to recovery.

Posted in Veterans News



Stamped Out

In the internet age, philately has lost its once-worldly charms.

Veterans Agency Seeks to Scrap Ethics Law on For-Profit Colleges

The department says the conflict-of-interest statute, passed after scandals in for-profit education, is outdated, but others call it a safeguard.

Heres How Much of Your Taxes Have Gone To Wars

Previously unreported Pentagon data shows how much the average U.S. taxpayer has paid for combat operations in Afghanistan, Iraq, and now Syria.

Once Trapped in Korea, Puerto Rican Vets Now Face Battle at Home

Puerto Rican veterans who survived the horrors of Korea wonder when their commander-in-chief will address their islands humanitarian crisis.

Could North Korea Shoot Down U.S. Warplanes?

Some of Pyongyang's surface-to-air missiles are old, but its newer ones could threaten American aircraft.

The Marines Finally Have Their First Female Infantry Officer

The lieutenant, who wants to keep her identity private, will lead a 40-person platoon.

Here Are the Options for Dealing With North Korea

As tensions between North Korea and the United States continue to intensify, two experts discuss the remaining options.

U.S. Was Ill-Prepared to Help Train Afghan Security Forces, IG Finds

One U.S. officer watched TV shows like Cops and NCIS for lesson plans, watchdog says.

Cyber Defense Is Very Much About Political Decisions

When European defense ministers played a tabletop cyber defense exercise, things got hard very quickly.

Analysis: Giving the Deep State More Leeway to Kill With Drones

President Trump is poised to compound the most grave moral failing of his predecessor by making targeted killings less safe, less legal, and less rare.